University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000
School of Architecture College of Design

Moi•ré—From Korean Traditions

Seoha Min, Graduate Student, U of MN
Helen Koo, Faculty, Auburn University

 

Moi-ré and Breeze provide designers with new ideas regarding the transformation of a garment and the adoption of natural dye to enhance sustainability and infuse traditional Korean women’s costume design from the late Chosun Dynasty into modern garments.

Moi-ré was inspired by the wave pattern of a small pond in a traditional Korean garden and the harmonious spirit found there. Natural objects such as trees, flowers and a pond are in harmony with the surrounding environment.The yellow attachment on the garment represents this harmony.

The fabric of Moi-ré is traditional organic Korean linen, a biodegradable fabric. The garment was dyed with Korean gardenia seeds and safflowers to avoid the production of harmful artificial chemicals. The five additional attachments enable the wearer to modify the location and shape of the attachment at the wearer’s discretion.


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Breeze — From Korean Traditions

Seoha Min, Graduate Student, U of MN
Helen Koo, Faculty, Auburn University


Breeze and Moi-ré provide designers with new ideas regarding the transformation of a garment and the adoption of natural dye to enhance sustainability and infuse traditional Korean women’s costume design from the late Chosun Dynasty into modern garments.

Breeze was inspired by the flowing movement of the air in the sky. The garment can be worn as a dress or a top by using various tying methods and different arm holes.

Breeze was made into a rectangular pattern to minimize excess fabric in the production process. The fabric, traditional organic Korean linen, was naturally dyed with traditional indigo produced in Korea. Further, naturally dying transforms the linen’s stiff texture into a lighter weight and softness that evokes a springtime breeze in Korea.

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Butterfly Transformation

Seoha Min, Graduate Student, U of MN

 

 


The design is an example of versatile clothing that can be worn for various situations, from everyday life to a special party. In the transformation process, the jacket becomes a dress by fastening the buttons on the cuff around the wearer’s neck. The purpose of the design is to provide new ideas for fashion designers on how to transform one piece of clothing into something totally different.

Soft brown synthetic leather captures the image of a caterpillar. In the transformation process, the sleeves become a halter neckline by fastening the buttons in the cuff. Various sheer fabrics, concealed inside the jacket, come out to form the bottom part of the dress. The sheer fabrics represent a buttertfly’s beautiful wings. The garment’s layered sheer fabrics were created by a hand-stitching process.

 

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Contact Information

Goldstein Museum of Design

364 McNeal Hall,

1985 Buford Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108

P: 612-624-7434 | gmd@umn.edu

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